The Water Element

Posted by on Dec 20, 2012 in Art, Feng Shui Definition, Five Elements | 0 comments

The Water element enhances spirituality, inspiration, relaxation, and the ability to go with the flow. Too much Water in an environment can promote spaciness and diminish productivity, while too little Water encourages stress, rivalry, anxiety, pettiness, and sarcasm.

The Water element is found in:

·            streams, pools, fountains, and water features of all kinds.

·            reflective surfaces such as cut crystal, glass, and mirrors.

·            flowing, free-form, and asymmetrical shapes.

·            art portraying bodies of water.

·            black and all dark tones, such as charcoal gray and navy blue.

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The Metal Element

Posted by on Dec 20, 2012 in Art, Feng Shui Definition, Five Elements | 0 comments

The Metal element enhances mental acuity and independence, and strengthens presence of mind, even in times of stress. Too much Metal creates mental rigidity, stubbornness, lack of teamwork, and the inability to compromise; while too little Metal promotes indecisiveness, procrastination, and confusion.

The Metal element is found in:

·            all metals, including stainless steel, copper, brass, iron, silver, aluminum, and gold.

·            cement, rocks, and stones—including marble, granite, and flagstone.

·            natural crystals and gemstones.

·            art and sculpture made from metal or stone.

·            circular, oval, and arched shapes.

·            white and light pastel colors.

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The Earth Element

Posted by on Dec 20, 2012 in Art, Feng Shui Definition, Five Elements | 0 comments

The Earth element enhances physical strength, sensuality, order, practicality, and stability. Too much Earth in a home creates an atmosphere that is heavy, serious, or conservative, while too little of the Earth element promotes instability, clutter, and chaos.

The Earth element is found in:

·            adobe, brick, and tile.

·            ceramics and earthenware objects.

·            square and rectangular shapes.

·            art portraying earthy landscapes, such as deserts or fertile fields.

·            yellow and all earthtones.

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The Wood Element

Posted by on Dec 20, 2012 in Art, Feng Shui Definition, Five Elements | 0 comments

Energetically, the Wood element fosters your intuition, creativity, flexibility, and expansion. When there’s too much Wood in an environment, it can promote a sense of being overwhelmed and a feeling of overcommitment, while too little Wood can stagnate growth and impede intuitive and creative flow.

The Wood element is found in:

·            wooden furniture, paneling, and accessories.

·            all plants and flowers, including silk, plastic, and dried plant material.

·            plant‑based cloth and textiles such as cotton and rayon.

·            floral upholstery, wall coverings, draperies, and linens.

·            art portraying landscapes, gardens, plants, and flowers.

·            columnar shapes, such as pillars, pedestals, and poles.

·            stripes.

·            blue and green tones

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A Quick Reference to Working With the Controlling Cycle

Posted by on Dec 16, 2012 in Feng Shui Definition, Five Elements | 0 comments

When the dominating element is Wood:

Bring in the Controlling element of  Metal,

Highlight with Earth and Fire,

Refine as needed with touches of Water.

 

When the dominant element is Fire:

Bring in the Controlling element of Water,

Highlight with Metal and Earth,

Refine as needed with touches of Wood.

 

When the dominant element is Earth:

Bring in the Controlling element of Wood,

Highlight with Metal and Water,

Refine as needed with touches of Fire.

 

When the dominant element is Metal:

Bring in the Controlling element of Fire,

Highlight with Water and Wood,

Refine as needed with touches of Earth.

 

When the dominant element is Water:

Bring in the Controlling element of Earth,

Highlight with Wood and Fire,

Refine as needed with touches of Metal.

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